Sunday, December 08, 2013

Wendy O. Williams, Bugsy Siegel , James Fenimore Cooper and Wild Bill Donovan

Earlier in the week I received this Email :

"I was hoping you could help me with some information on a book plate I recently purchased.  I've attached a photo.  Im not a bookplate collector rather a collector of 20th century organized crime artifacts.  I believe the bookplate I purchased belonged to infamous gangster Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel.  The name of Ben and his wife are correct and it appears to be the correct time period (1930's - 40's).  Is there anyway to determine any other info associated with the bookplate?  Like the  printing manufacturer or artist?
 Any insight will be helpful.? 



                                                     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugsy_Siegel


I suggested that he should contact Mr.Siegel's daughter to which he replied::
"Thanks for the response.  I actually already reached out to Millicent through the Mob exhibit she was working with in Vegas.  She said she didn't particularly remember the book plate"

So there you have it , a bookplate with a famous person's name which can't for the moment be authenticated.

From time to time I have purchased such bookplates. It's like buying a lottery ticket even thought you know statistically it is a waste of money..

Here are a few more examples :
Wendy O. Williams

Wild Bill Donovan

This bookplate was engraved by Tiffany and Co. for James Fenimore Copper's grandson, 

If you have other examples of bookplates that  fall into this hope springs eternal category send scans to
Bookplatemaven@hotmail.com      and they will be added to this posting.

Turn Me Upside Down Advertising
From the late 19th through the early 20th century these kinds of advertisements were popular



Here is a bookplate in that style:

If you know what the  Chinese word means please let me know.
See you next week.

12/9/2013 Xg Yu sent me the following information:

Hi Lew,
 
That character pronouces as 'lian', apparently a Chinese name that owner chose for 'Leonard'.

It is commonly used as a verb in Chinese which means 'to connect'


1 comment:

Enusan said...

The Chinese word when "flipped" is 連 (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%80%A3)

The first image is an impossible character as far as I can tell.